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FAQs on going veggie

A: It’s easy to get enough protein as almost all foods contain some protein, though both quantity and quality do vary. Good vegetarian sources of protein include nuts, pulses (beans, peas, chickpeas), eggs, dairy, tofu and most meat substitutes. Eating dishes using these foods combined with rice, grains, pasta or bread, which also contain different kinds of protein, is an easy way to reach your recommended daily intake.

If you would like further information on how to eat well as a vegetarian, our ‘Going veggie’ booklet is a great place to start. It also offers practical advice and guidance on making the switch to a meat-free diet.

Download our ‘Going veggie’ guide.

If you prefer a hard copy of the booklet you can order online.  

A: It’s important to maintain a good level of iron in the body as it helps with your energy levels and nerve function. Fortified breakfast cereals and wholemeal bread, green leafy vegetables, nuts, pulses, grains, dried fruit and tofu all contain iron. To increase the level of iron absorbed by your body, eat iron-rich foods at the same time as foods or drinks high in vitamin C.

If you would like further information on how to get enough iron into your diet, our ‘Going veggie’ booklet is a great place to start. It also offers practical advice and guidance on making the switch to a meat-free diet.

Download our ‘Going veggie’ guide.

If you prefer a hard copy of the booklet you can order online.  

A: Vitamin B12 is important for healthy blood and growth and also helps to keep the eyes, brain and nervous system functioning normally. Dairy products and eggs contain B12, while many margarines, breakfast cereals, yeast extracts, soya milks and yoghurts are fortified with B12.

If you would like further information on how to get enough B12 into your diet, our ‘Going veggie’ booklet is a great place to start. It also offers practical advice and guidance on making the switch to a meat-free diet.

Download our ‘Going veggie’ guide.

If you prefer a hard copy the booklet you can order online.  

A: No, a vegetarian diet is suitable for all ages as long as it is sensibly planned. A balanced vegetarian diet can supply all the nutrients required and should include plenty of fruit and vegetables and starchy foods, along with foods high in protein, some dairy produce or alternatives and small amounts of fat and sugar.

If you would like practical advice and guidance on making the switch to a meat-free diet then our ‘Going veggie’ guide is a great place to start.

Download our ‘Going veggie’ guide.

If you prefer a hard copy of the booklet you can order online.

A: Yes, many people are the proud parents of healthy vegetarian and vegan children but healthy eating for babies is different than for adults and older children. The nutritional requirements of a small baby are high, as they need proportionally more protein, calcium and most other nutrients than at any other time of their life.

If you would like further information and advice on feeding your baby a vegetarian diet, our ‘Vegetarian pregnancies, vegetarian babies’ is a great place to start.

Download our ‘Vegetarian pregnancies, vegetarian babies’ booklet.

If you prefer a hard copy of the booklet you can order online.

A: No, a varied and balanced diet, especially one rich in whole grains, pulses, nuts, fruits and vegetables with moderate amounts of eggs and dairy, will provide all the nutrients that most people need. Fruits and vegetables that provide vitamins also provide important things like fibre which can’t be obtained from supplements. Supplements should not be thought of as a shortcut in place of healthy eating, although they can be useful if you have been advised to increase your intake of specific nutrients.

If you would like further information you can see our health and nutrition pages or download our ‘Health eating for vegetarians’ booklet.

If you prefer a hard copy of the booklet you can order online.

If you have a health issue and would like help in identifying a professional, qualified nutritionist then please contact us: info@vegsoc.org

Protein, found in meat, is essential for the body’s growth and repair so it’s important to replace the meat in your diet with other protein-rich foods.  Nuts, pulses (beans, peas, chickpeas), eggs, dairy, tofu and most meat substitutes are all good vegetarian sources of protein.  Protein should, however, be eaten in moderation as part of a sensibly planned vegetarian diet.

Iron is also very important and can be found in fortified breakfast cereals and wholemeal bread, green leafy vegetables, nuts, pulses, grains, dried fruit and tofu.

Other vitamins and minerals commonly found in meat are also available from vegetarian sources. If you would like further information you can see our health and nutrition pages or download our ‘Health eating for vegetarians’ booklet.

If you’re not sure how to cook without meat, we have a huge selection of recipes online and a wide range of recipe booklets and cards to download.

If you prefer a hard copy of any of our information or recipe booklets you can order online.

A: Most vegetarians probably don’t wear leather as there are veggie-friendly alternatives out there that look very similar. In truth there’s no hard and fast rule and it’s a question of what you personally feel comfortable with.

A: Yes, eggs are suitable for people who eat a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet and this is the most common type of vegetarian diet. Many lacto-ovo vegetarians will only eat free-range eggs because they object to the intensive farming of hens. Through its Vegetarian Society Approved trade mark, the Vegetarian Society only endorses products containing free-range eggs.

Lacto-vegetarians eat dairy products but avoid eggs and vegans do not eat any animal products at all.

A: Vegetarians don’t eat fish, they never have and never will. A person who follows a mainly vegetarian diet but eats fish is not a vegetarian – the proper term for them is pescetarian.  Omega 3 essential fatty acids, found in oily fish, are needed for a healthy nervous system and brain function however there are vegetarian alternatives, such as flax seeds and oil, rapeseed oil and walnuts.

If you would like further information on how to get enough Omega 3 into your diet, our ‘Going veggie’ booklet is a great place to start. It also offers practical advice and guidance on making the switch to a meat-free diet.

Download our ‘Going veggie’ guide.

If you prefer a hard copy the booklet you can order online.  

A: Not everyone, even your friends and family, may understand about a vegetarian diet or the motivations behind your decision to go veggie. Don’t worry and don’t lose heart, there are plenty of people out there who do. You could join the Vegetarian Society and benefit from our members’ mentor scheme which offers invaluable support. There are also plenty of local vegetarian groups out there who are always happy for new members to join and can give you encouragement along the way.  You can also get advice and chat to likeminded people in the Vegetarian Society forum for New Veggies.

If you would like further information on the support you can get then please browse our ‘Going Veggie’ section.

A: Yes, a well-planned vegetarian diet offers all the nutrients an athlete could need. A little more nutritional knowledge and thought planning meals might be advisable to ensure all your requirements are met.

If you would like further information on vegetarian health and nutrition, our ‘Going veggie’ booklet is a great place to start. It also offers practical advice and guidance on making the switch to a meat-free diet.

Download our ‘Going veggie’ guide.

If you prefer a hard copy the booklet you can order online.    


 

Got a general question about vegetarianism?

See the FAQs

 

Got a question about Vegetarian Society Membership?

See the Membership FAQs

 

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The Vegetarian Society of the United Kingdom Limited, Parkdale, Dunham Road, Altrincham WA14 4QG
Registered Charity No. 259358, Registered Company No. 959115 (England and Wales)

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Privacy | | Contact | Press | Advertising | Jobs

The Vegetarian Society of the United Kingdom Limited, Parkdale, Dunham Road, Altrincham WA14 4QG
Registered Charity No. 259358, Registered Company No. 959115 (England and Wales)